acc1's blog

By acc1, 11 years ago, In English
Suppose there is a contest going on , and there is a question on interval trees.
Then "can" or rather "should" we ask on forums about the implementation of a interval tree. Because that makes no difference you see, an interval tree is so trivial, there is nothing new about it . (and to solve given problem you will atleast have to apply your mind , after implementing that tree)

And if there is a question on tree , then are we not allowed to discuss anything about tree?Like I want to know how many trees can be formed with n nodes.
Then if it helps a little bit , should we ask or not?

So, Actually I want to ask is that , should we ask a "trivial" question or not , given that it might help me solving that problem.


[for people who think that we should not ask, one question , with these competitions running like marathons , when will we get chance to ask others?]

-As I have seen Petr also discusses with his friends when he gets in trouble.
( although I am not sure whether he did it after the contest or during , but I think he did it during the contest.)

 
 
 
 
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11 years ago, # |
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If all you want to get is a working implementation of interval trees - just google for it. Why others should waste their time implementing it for you if there is a number of working solutions? If you've downloaded working solution from the web and use it in competition it's ok, from my point of view (Unless competition rules said you shouldn't).

If you want to understand several difficult accepts of implementation - of cause you can ask a question. But try to be as concrete as possible, so others can understand that you really want to learn something new, not just win a competition using others brains instead of yours.

For example if I see a topic "GIVE ME IMPLEMENTATION OF INTERVAL TREE!!!! QUICKLY !!!111" I'll click a red arrow or just ignore it.

And if I see a topic "Please, explain why interval trees are working O(n*log(n)) time" I'll answer if i have enough time.
  • 11 years ago, # ^ |
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    Thanks for your reply.
    Yes, I was asking that only . 
    ""Please, explain why interval trees are working O(n*log(n)) time""
    That , if I try to learn that algorithm during contest from someone , is it fair or not?
    According to you that is fair , and you will try to answer such qeuries (if time permits) .
    Thanks for the clarification.

11 years ago, # |
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First of all, your fantasies about Petr look like personal insult. If I were you, I'd apologize to him.

Secondly, it's usually clearly stated, that discussing any questions related to problems during competition is considered cheating. Just an example of such rules: Cheating at TopCoder.
  • 11 years ago, # ^ |
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    As I told I am not sure he did it during contest.
    But even if he did it during contest , does it make a difference , I don't think so.
    Everyone can ask someone who is not participating.



    In no manner I was trying to insult him.
    Sorry If I sounded like that.


    PS: I may have misinterpreted . 

    This is not a personal comment on Petr, I was just taking example.
    • 11 years ago, # ^ |
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      No, it does make difference.
      You said that you think he was discussing problems during contest. That means that you think he was cheating.

      Your opinion ("everyone can ask someone who is not participating") contradicts the rules. If you can't just click the link I'd cite it for you:
      "Collaborating in any way with anyone else (member or not) during a rated event is considered cheating. This includes discussing problem statements or solutions between the time that the coding phase begins and the time that the challenge phase ends."
      Almost the same is written about TC Marathon:
      "Collaborating in any way with anyone else (member or not) during a rated event is considered cheating. This includes discussing problem statements or solutions at any time until the conclusion of the submission phase."

      (These are TC rules, the rules for other competitions may differ, but as I understand, it's common rule, that discussing problems during the contest is prohibited.)