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ch_egor's blog

By ch_egor, 10 months ago, translation, In English,
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(Developing — gritukan, ch_egor, V--o_o--V, demon1999)

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10 months ago, # |
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Thanks for the editorial !

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10 months ago, # |
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For Problem F,cant we make p = sqrt(n) and get the complexity as n*root(n)?

Or did I misunderstood something?

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    10 months ago, # ^ |
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    Complexity is for movement of , and for movement of . If you choose you got .

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      10 months ago, # ^ |
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      My bad

      Thanks for the reply

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      9 months ago, # ^ |
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      I'm having trouble understanding how those complexities are derived. Can you explain it in more detail? Thanks!

      Edit: figured it out.

      There are O(N^2/P^2) blocks, each with O(P^2/N) elements.

      Left pointer: For each block with O(P^2/N) elements, it takes O(P) to go from one element to the next. So the complexity for processing each block is O(P^3/N), and the complexity of processing every block is O(P^3/N) * O(N^2/P^2) = O(NP).

      Right pointer: For each of O(N^2/P^2) blocks, the right pointer moves O(N) times. The total number of times the right pointer moves is O(N^3/P^2).

      We can find the minimum complexity by setting the left and right pointers complexity equal. So NP = N^3/P^2, which gives P = N^(2/3). So the total complexity for both movements is O(N^(5/3)).

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10 months ago, # |
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plz explain

n>=k part in problem c

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10 months ago, # |
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In 5th problem it should be multiset and not set as there could be equal values.

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10 months ago, # |
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plzz explain the third point in problem B??

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10 months ago, # |
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can someone tell me problem in this 35727835 __ __fixed now

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10 months ago, # |
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The explanation for D kinda seems more complicated than it needs to be. I mean... the problem gives you three cases.

First case allows you to change a 1 to a 0 if some condition happens. Second case allows you to change a 0 to a 1 if some condition happens. Third case allows you to keep the current digit (with no condition).

Therefore, to solve, if the current digit was changed from a 1 to a 0, apply the restrictions for case 1; if it was changed from a 0 to a 1, apply restrictions for case 2. Else, no restrictions need to be applied.

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    10 months ago, # ^ |
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    All cases here are just for prove that we haven't other cases. It's obvious that we don't need upper bound for and lower bound for .

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10 months ago, # |
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For multiset in E do we maintain a rolling sum. When inserting in multiset we add it to that sum and while removing ( if the size of multiset exceeds the required (i-j+1)/c elements ) we subtract. And final is sum of i-j+1 elements minus the rolling sum we maintained? Or we have to do something else?

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    10 months ago, # ^ |
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    I don't get why you even need a rolling sum

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      10 months ago, # ^ |
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      'storing sum of minimums in some structure like std::multiset.'

      I did not understand this line in the editorial.

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        9 months ago, # ^ |
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        So i also struggled with this line for some time. And here is what i figured:

        you'll need four things: a tree-multiset (multiset< int > ms), an integer containing sum (int sum), an integer with the greatest element in the multiset to be contained in the sum (the greatest summant; int geis) and an integer counting summants equal to geis in the sum (int nog).

        Firstly we set: ms = empty multiset, sum = geis = nog = 0; Only when ms.size() == c we reassign sum and geis with the first smallest number in ms: sum = geis = *(ms.begin()); nog = 1;

        Now, when you insert an element (int el) to ms you need to update sum and geis values only when ms.size() > c.

        1. If el < geis:
        sum += el;
        sum -= geis; //we replace geis as a summant with el in sum.
        if (nog == 1){
        geis = *(ms.lower_bound(geis)--); // we find the first "old" geis position in ms and get value of previous element - this is our "new" greatest summant
        nog = ms.count(geis);
        } else {
        nog--;
        }
        
        1. If number of summants increase (ms.size() % c == 0) we add to the sum next value not less than geis:
        int geis_count = ms.count(geis);
        if (geis_count > nog){
        nog++;
        } else {
        nog = 1;
        geis = *(ms.upper_bound(geis));
        }
        sum += geis;
        

        Please note, that each update requires O(1) searches (or other operations with the same complexity) in a tree-multiset of size O(n), thus requiring O(log n) time for each insert, O(n log n) time for each i in the main for loop and finally O(n**2 log n) for the solution.

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10 months ago, # |
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For problem F: sorry, I don't understand why we should change t to one in O(1) time. And does it means that we should let r be the sequence of {r1, r1 + s, r1 + 2s, ...}(s = n2 / P2) and let l and t be different number in n as step of P so there may be O(n5 / 3 × n2 / 3) different movement.

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    10 months ago, # ^ |
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    I think it's supposed to say that you can change t by one in O(1) time, i.e. go from t to t + 1 or t - 1 as necessary. What you do is sort the queries as described and answer them using Mo's Algorithm.

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      10 months ago, # ^ |
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      thx~ , I have to learn how to use Mo's algorithm.

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9 months ago, # |
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In editorial of F, how it's ensured after sorting that 1st type queries are calculated after the intended number of 2nd type queries for ex. lets say P = 10 so for number of change queries from 1 to 9 will fall together and there might be wrong ordering in processing them.

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9 months ago, # |
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I do not understand in problem B 3 case can anyone plzz tell me in simple terms it will be very helpful thnkss ?

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9 months ago, # |
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Can we Solve 940-B using BFS?