CooloTran's blog

By CooloTran, history, 4 weeks ago, In English

I'm curious about how does your area choose students for the national olympiad of informatics. In my province (Lam Dong — Vietnam), around 20 students participated in the selection round and 8 of them will be able to participate in the national olympiad of informatics (in Viet Nam). There are 4 problems and all of them are very old problems which occured in Codeforces or VNOJ (our country's online judge) which help students who has done it has a huge advantage (Which seems not fair at all to me).

 
 
 
 
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4 weeks ago, # |
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In my country (Canada), the selection for our national olympiad, the CCO (Canadian Computing Olympiad), is done with a separate competition called the CCC (Canadian Computing Competition). These competitions are prepared by the University of Waterloo. The CCC is split into two divisions, junior and senior. Each division has 5 problems meant to be solved in a 3-hour window, and there may be some problems used in both divisions.

They usually take the top 20 or so contestants from the senior division to compete in the CCO, but last year's CCO had closer to 40 participants.

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4 weeks ago, # |
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There are four stages of the Romanian olympiad: school-level, city-level, county-level (counties are the Romanian equivalent of provinces) and the national-level. The first two stages most of the times feature quite easy problems, are held sometime in January and/or February and their purpose is to rule out the weaker students.

The county-level stage is harder, featuring 3 problems in 4 hours. These problems are the same for all the counties and, as far as I've seen, don't seem to be copied from somewhere, but they can feel quite standard. The students who rank first in their county are qualified for the national stage. The ones who didn't get first place in their county are placed in a country-wide ranking and the first ~90 people in this ranking are also qualified for the national stage. There are some small edge-case scenarios to this process, but this is the gist of it.

Fun fact: until 2021, none of the Romanian olympiad stages featured live submission feedback. This meant that you would only find out the result of your submission only a few hours after you've finished the competition. At every competition, I would spend something like half an hour almost obsesively checking the array bounds and the output format of my code so that I wouldn't get an unexpected 0 points verdict.

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4 weeks ago, # |
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In my country (China), we have the province team selection contest (let's call it PTSC here, in fact it's always called as [province name]OI) every year for China National Olympiad in Informatics (CNOI) after NOI in Province (NOIP) contest and the winter camp (WC).

There are three plans for every province to choose: I) NOIP*40%+PTSC(2 days)*60%; II) NOIP*60%+WC*40%; III) NOIP*30%+WC*30%+PTSC(2 days)*40%. The PTSC tasks are setted by China Computer Federation. There are two sets of problems (A/B) that are in different difficulties for provinces to choose.

They usually take 5~17 top contestants in each province to compete in CNOI.

This year might be my first chance to compete in CNOI, so I'll work hard toward it and wish me good luck :)

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    4 weeks ago, # ^ |
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    And if one school holds CNOI(this year/last year/next year) , more students(2 or 7) in this school can compete in CNOI.

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    4 weeks ago, # ^ |
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    What are your chances, considering u r 2k+ ?

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      4 weeks ago, # ^ |
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      In some provinces, it is really difficult, maybe he can't compete in CNOI.

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      4 weeks ago, # ^ |
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      1. The competition rules is different from CF so CF rank/rating is not that accurate.
      2. You can check the rank list of Beijing, China. Besides, only high school students can compete in CNOI.
      3. I said "chance", which means "possibility" instead of "certainty". I'll work hard toward it. If I failed, I can continue trying next year.
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4 weeks ago, # |
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In my country(India) lets say if there are 4 seats so 2 will be reserved for backward caste,1 will be reserved for women and for other 1(almost 2 lac people will compete(high population)).

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4 weeks ago, # |
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As a Chinese, that makes me think of my previous blog.

Please look into this blog, 'cause I think I've explained everything I can explain clearly. Hope I'll have the chance to participate in NOI this season :)

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4 weeks ago, # |
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Your blog is so interesting. I think the judges should think about it. I wish you will have more amazing achievements in your coding future!

Cheers

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4 weeks ago, # |
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In the US there's USACO. Four levels: Bronze, Silver, Gold, Platinum. Theren't not really a NOI. The best people in Platinum go to a camp at Clemson University to prepare for IOI

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4 weeks ago, # |
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I'm in your country so I understand

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4 weeks ago, # |
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It does seem not fair at all, but I think that is the situation of a lot more places. Mine used to choose old problems from SPOJ too. (for those who don't know, there was Vietnamese subpages of SPOJ, vn.spoj.com. it's the predecessor of VNOJ)

How was the test anyway? Do you think you will make the team this year?

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    4 weeks ago, # ^ |
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    The tests was so bad that some bruteforces solution get beaten by a short and simple greedy solution ( that can be hacked easily in 5 minutes ). ( Btw I'm failed :( )

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4 weeks ago, # |
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we solve problems on paper)

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It's surprising to find that China and Canada have a very similar series of Computing Olympiads.

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In Belarus we have five stages of selection.

[1]. Olympiads in schools.

[2]. Olympiads in big towns.

[3]. Olympiads in regions.

[4]. Belarusian OI (whole country)

Format of these contests is most usual four tasks in five hours, IOI-styled.

[5]. Top-12 participants have one week of solving problems. According to their results in this week, top-4 go to IOI.

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4 weeks ago, # |
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In Turkey, we have 6 stages of selection contests and camps

  • First Selection Test: It's on paper, we have 50 questions, 15 of them are cancer C questions (pointer of pointer of pointer), 10 of them are algorithm questions like it describes you a bst, then you need to find total number of operations for find, insert and things like that, and 25 of them are discrete math questions. 50 — 60 students pass this and students from last years national team can skip this.
  • Summer Camp: It's 15 days and mostly for beginners and hanging out with friends.
  • Second Selection Contest: It's IOI style, 2 days, 3 problems and 5 hours per day and prepared by our mentors, sadly problems are mostly data structure-based. The First 25-30 students pass this and 24 of them get medals.
  • Winter Camp: It's 15 days and is mostly about solving problems. Also, students learn some more advanced algorithms and data structures.
  • Team Selection Contest: It's like a second selection contest but problems are harder and rankings are more subtask based than getting 100 in every problem. 4 people get selected for the team.
  • Team Camp: Legends say once team camps were organized in Turkey, sadly this year we had no team camp but it was supposed to be about solving IOI problems and discussing them with team members.
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    4 weeks ago, # ^ |
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    important to note: the first stage exam does NOT fit in with the rest of the stages. a lot of people who are good competitive programmers can't pass it and people with no knowledge of coding can pass easily as long as they know a bit of math (and not do silly calculation mistakes). it's kinda annoying, but it is what it is...

    EDIT: another thing to add is that turkish olympiads in general are relatively algo heavy (as far as i have seen)

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4 weeks ago, # |
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I'm from the Philippines — these are the general rules (they change slightly every year, here are the regulations for 2021).

  • The first round, the elimination round, is held online, and any Filipino high school student can join. The format is like that of a CodeChef long challenge, lasting about 10 days (from 18:00 of a Friday to 23:59 of the next Sunday), with about 15 problems with subtasks. The top 30 contestants advance to the final round.
  • The final round is usually held onsite, but in recent years it had to go online for virus reasons. It's a two-day contest, with each day featuring 4-5 problems with subtasks to be solved in 5 hours. The top 15 or so people get to join the training camp.
  • In the training camp, people are trained over a span of several weeks, with a bunch of OI-style contests interspersed, culminating in a final team round. Taking the results from the final round and the training camp into account, the top 4 students are selected for the IOI.