For technical reasons, some programming languages (Kotlin, C #) will not be available during round 877. ×

B. Undoubtedly Lucky Numbers
time limit per test
2 seconds
memory limit per test
256 megabytes
input
standard input
output
standard output

Polycarpus loves lucky numbers. Everybody knows that lucky numbers are positive integers, whose decimal representation (without leading zeroes) contain only the lucky digits x and y. For example, if x = 4, and y = 7, then numbers 47, 744, 4 are lucky.

Let's call a positive integer a undoubtedly lucky, if there are such digits x and y (0 ≤ x, y ≤ 9), that the decimal representation of number a (without leading zeroes) contains only digits x and y.

Polycarpus has integer n. He wants to know how many positive integers that do not exceed n, are undoubtedly lucky. Help him, count this number.

Input

The first line contains a single integer n (1 ≤ n ≤ 109) — Polycarpus's number.

Output

Print a single integer that says, how many positive integers that do not exceed n are undoubtedly lucky.

Examples
Input
10
Output
10
Input
123
Output
113
Note

In the first test sample all numbers that do not exceed 10 are undoubtedly lucky.

In the second sample numbers 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 120, 123 are not undoubtedly lucky.