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C. Bear and Polynomials
time limit per test
2 seconds
memory limit per test
256 megabytes
input
standard input
output
standard output

Limak is a little polar bear. He doesn't have many toys and thus he often plays with polynomials.

He considers a polynomial valid if its degree is n and its coefficients are integers not exceeding k by the absolute value. More formally:

Let a0, a1, ..., an denote the coefficients, so . Then, a polynomial P(x) is valid if all the following conditions are satisfied:

  • ai is integer for every i;
  • |ai| ≤ k for every i;
  • an ≠ 0.

Limak has recently got a valid polynomial P with coefficients a0, a1, a2, ..., an. He noticed that P(2) ≠ 0 and he wants to change it. He is going to change one coefficient to get a valid polynomial Q of degree n that Q(2) = 0. Count the number of ways to do so. You should count two ways as a distinct if coefficients of target polynoms differ.

Input

The first line contains two integers n and k (1 ≤ n ≤ 200 000, 1 ≤ k ≤ 109) — the degree of the polynomial and the limit for absolute values of coefficients.

The second line contains n + 1 integers a0, a1, ..., an (|ai| ≤ k, an ≠ 0) — describing a valid polynomial . It's guaranteed that P(2) ≠ 0.

Output

Print the number of ways to change one coefficient to get a valid polynomial Q that Q(2) = 0.

Examples
Input
3 1000000000
10 -9 -3 5
Output
3
Input
3 12
10 -9 -3 5
Output
2
Input
2 20
14 -7 19
Output
0
Note

In the first sample, we are given a polynomial P(x) = 10 - 9x - 3x2 + 5x3.

Limak can change one coefficient in three ways:

  1. He can set a0 =  - 10. Then he would get Q(x) =  - 10 - 9x - 3x2 + 5x3 and indeed Q(2) =  - 10 - 18 - 12 + 40 = 0.
  2. Or he can set a2 =  - 8. Then Q(x) = 10 - 9x - 8x2 + 5x3 and indeed Q(2) = 10 - 18 - 32 + 40 = 0.
  3. Or he can set a1 =  - 19. Then Q(x) = 10 - 19x - 3x2 + 5x3 and indeed Q(2) = 10 - 38 - 12 + 40 = 0.

In the second sample, we are given the same polynomial. This time though, k is equal to 12 instead of 109. Two first of ways listed above are still valid but in the third way we would get |a1| > k what is not allowed. Thus, the answer is 2 this time.