Bugman's blog

By Bugman, history, 2 years ago, In English,

Your given a simple task:

For given number 2 ≤ n ≤ 1018 check prime or not it is.

Limits are: 1 second TL, 16Mb ML.

And we have solution:

bool isprime(LL n){
	if(n<2) return false;
	for(LL i=2;i*i*i<=n;++i) if(n%i==0) return false;
	for(int it=0;it<1e5;++it){
		LL i = rand()%(n-1)+1;
		if(__gcd(i,n)!=1) return false;
		if(mpow(i,n-1,n)!=1) return false;
	}
	return true;
}

where rand() returns 64-bit random integer and mpow(a,b,m) is ab modulo m.

Can you challenge this solution?

 
 
 
 
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2 years ago, # |
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How likely is it that it is gonna say that the number is a prime, when in reality it isn't?

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2 years ago, # |
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Fails for 999999999999999989

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    2 years ago, # ^ |
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    No, it is prime number and solution returns true.

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      2 years ago, # ^ |
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      On my machine it returns false!

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        2 years ago, # ^ |
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        show me your mpow

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          2 years ago, # ^ |
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          ll Pow(ll n, ll p, ll m) {
          	if(!p) return 1; 
          	else if(p & 1) return (n * Pow(n, p-1, m)) % m;
          	else {
          		ll v = Pow(n, p/2, m); 
          		return (v*v) % m;
          	}
          }
          
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            2 years ago, # ^ |
              Vote: I like it +24 Vote: I do not like it

            so you have 64-bit integer multiplication overflow...

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              2 years ago, # ^ |
              Rev. 2   Vote: I like it 0 Vote: I do not like it

              Oh, I missed it :3 mod ≤ 1018

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              2 years ago, # ^ |
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              Using return ((__int128)n * Pow(n, p-1, m)) % m; gave right answer. :)

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                2 years ago, # ^ |
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                Can you please give me the full code of this Prime checking? Thanks In Advance

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2 years ago, # |
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Link

Line if(mpow(i,n-1,n)!=1) return false; won't never be executed.

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    2 years ago, # ^ |
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    Line with __gcd is very likely to be executed for Carmichael numbers, since they have small primes in their factorization.

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    2 years ago, # ^ |
    Rev. 3   Vote: I like it +8 Vote: I do not like it

    those numbers have at least 3 primes in factorization?

    if yes then ok, because of this line

    for(LL i=2;i*i*i<=n;++i) if(n%i==0) return false;

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2 years ago, # |
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im fake reyna 15241579244017681=123456791^2

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2 years ago, # |
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bool isprime(LL n){
	if(n<2) return false;
	for(LL i=2;i<1000000;++i) if(n%i==0) return false;
	LL i = rand()%(n-1)+1;
	if(mpow(i,n-1,n)!=1) return false;
	return true;
}

I slightly modified the code and now it performs the power test only once, still I'm quite confident that it's correct.

The only interesting case is N = pq where p, q > 1000000 are large primes. The test fails when in - 1 = 1. However, by Euler's theorem, you know i(p - 1)(q - 1) = 1, and by combining these two equations you get ip + q - 2 = 1. There are at most p + q - 2 such i and the probability that this happens is at most (p + q - 2) / (n - 1) < 0.000002.

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    2 years ago, # ^ |
    Rev. 3   Vote: I like it 0 Vote: I do not like it

    "There are at most p  +  q  -  2 such i"

    I don't get it. Can you explain why?

    UPD. I think that if q = 2p - 1 and p, q are both primes then we have only two conditions on i: and . First one holds for remainders modulo q (exactly for quadratic residues) and second for p - 1 remainders modulo p (all non-zero remainders). So there are solutions modulo pq (because of Chinese remainder theorem).

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      2 years ago, # ^ |
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      Let P be a polynomial of degree k (on any field). Then the number of roots of P is at most k.

      (If r1, r2, ... are roots, (x - r1)(x - r2)... must be a divisor of P(x))

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        2 years ago, # ^ |
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        I still don't get it. is not a field. I expressed my doubts in UPD to my previous comment.

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          2 years ago, # ^ |
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          Yes, you are right, I was stupid :)

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2 years ago, # |
Rev. 2   Vote: I like it +15 Vote: I do not like it

Do you know how to challenge this solution or you wondering whether it possible? It seems to me that this code is correct and 105 iterations is way too much.

Explanation
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    2 years ago, # ^ |
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    answer to the question: second, i'm just interesting

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2 years ago, # |
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Btw, it's Fermat primality test, with hack to work with Carmichael numbers.

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    2 years ago, # ^ |
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    see my answer to RomaWhite before

    but thanks, i didn't knew such test, I created this function 2 years ago just for fun

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2 years ago, # |
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Just in case someone didn't know about this. Some time ago, MauricioC told me there were small bases of witnesses to perform Miller-Rabin deterministically for values up to 264.

Then I found this. Here you can find such witnesses and perform safely your primality test in O(logn).

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    2 years ago, # ^ |
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    You can also use the first 12 primes as candidate witnesses (source). Arguably, 12 candidates might be a bit less efficient than 7, but the set is much easier to remember.

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2 years ago, # |
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There is a inbuilt method in JAVA in BigInteger class for prime checking. Is that method slow for prime checking? Should I avoid using that in live competition? { Method is object.isProbablePrime(int certainty))