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C. Prairie Partition
time limit per test
2 seconds
memory limit per test
256 megabytes
input
standard input
output
standard output

It can be shown that any positive integer x can be uniquely represented as x = 1 + 2 + 4 + ... + 2k - 1 + r, where k and r are integers, k ≥ 0, 0 < r ≤ 2k. Let's call that representation prairie partition of x.

For example, the prairie partitions of 12, 17, 7 and 1 are:

12 = 1 + 2 + 4 + 5,

17 = 1 + 2 + 4 + 8 + 2,

7 = 1 + 2 + 4,

1 = 1.

Alice took a sequence of positive integers (possibly with repeating elements), replaced every element with the sequence of summands in its prairie partition, arranged the resulting numbers in non-decreasing order and gave them to Borys. Now Borys wonders how many elements Alice's original sequence could contain. Find all possible options!

Input

The first line contains a single integer n (1 ≤ n ≤ 105) — the number of numbers given from Alice to Borys.

The second line contains n integers a1, a2, ..., an (1 ≤ ai ≤ 1012; a1 ≤ a2 ≤ ... ≤ an) — the numbers given from Alice to Borys.

Output

Output, in increasing order, all possible values of m such that there exists a sequence of positive integers of length m such that if you replace every element with the summands in its prairie partition and arrange the resulting numbers in non-decreasing order, you will get the sequence given in the input.

If there are no such values of m, output a single integer -1.

Examples
Input
8
1 1 2 2 3 4 5 8
Output
2 
Input
6
1 1 1 2 2 2
Output
2 3 
Input
5
1 2 4 4 4
Output
-1
Note

In the first example, Alice could get the input sequence from [6, 20] as the original sequence.

In the second example, Alice's original sequence could be either [4, 5] or [3, 3, 3].