ko_osaga's blog

By ko_osaga, history, 7 months ago, In English,

To jump on a bandwagon, I'll run a boring stream, where I'll virtual participate JOI Spring Camp 2019 Day2 (or Day1 if that's harder). The time will be 3/21 Thursday 7:30 PM UTC+9 (KST)

https://www.twitch.tv/koosaga

If this works out well, I'll maybe continue streaming after WF. I'll try to solve problems that is both hard and annoying, something like this.

See you!

 
 
 
 
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7 months ago, # |
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How to write these contests virtual, not at 1:00 (UTC)?

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    7 months ago, # ^ |
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    I assumed they will hold an analysis session. If they don't, I'll just solve other hard JOI problems instead.

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7 months ago, # |
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Please [ subscribe & follow & like ] wookje tv (^-^)

https://twitch.tv/wookje

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    7 months ago, # ^ |
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    WoW woookje tv is very fun! I won't miss the live broadcast!

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7 months ago, # |
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Still no 100pt solution for that one problem from IOI 2003...

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    7 months ago, # ^ |
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    lol is it even possible to score > 88

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      7 months ago, # ^ |
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      That's what I'd like to know. After all, it's strange that there would be a problem without a 100pt solution. Spoiler alert: the only official(ish?) solution I found describes something that seems to score 88.

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        7 months ago, # ^ |
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        I don't think it's possible in 5 hours, but overall it's possible... I was given the task about 1-2 years ago, and gave it 2 weeks, after which I got 100.

        I also lost the source code (this is the only thing I have left), but if you want to challenge me to rewrite it (maybe given a judge?) then sure.

        I barely remember the idea, but it doesn't give away the solution;

        • Try to maintain values to print, but don't print necessarily right away.
        • You can reorder elements (not necessarily an increasing sequence) for easier implementation.

        Edit: Well apparently I have some source code that is incomplete, and some of the output files for some inputs. This is one of them, solving n=255 using upto 4 consecutive S operations at any time. I think this expresses all that's necessary to solve for fullscore.

        Specifically, the bounds I kind of remember are:

        8, 44, (I think 97 or 101), (I think 137 or 173), 257.

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          7 months ago, # ^ |
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          The judge is Yandex IOI archive.

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            7 months ago, # ^ |
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            Done :) (you can view in the standings)

            The first time I solved the problem I wrote a lot of case analysis to do the best thing I found on paper. This time I tried to write something more general, which was able to solve with 1 operation upto 44, 2 operations upto 101 and 4 operations upto 257. For some reason it bugs for 3 operations (bound should be around 180-190 I think), but I tried submitting without it (solving either with 1,2,4). Jury's answers are weak enough to let this pass with 99 points, and then I had to improve just n=112 so I did the stupid thing that solves in 8 + 36T for some limit T.

            tl;dr: My code is not general, just solves whatever is good enough for the jury. I couldn't bother fixing it, as it was unnecessary (my general solution improves jury's answers for tests 12,13).

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              7 months ago, # ^ |
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              Wow, good job! I really thought it was impossible, now I know that I can improve my total score in that IOI archive and that it makes for a good challenge to others.

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7 months ago, # |
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Pretty please, just use Science & Technology category!

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7 months ago, # |
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Wow, it's super fun. Maybe you guys can compete for writing annoying problems.

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    7 months ago, # ^ |
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    Well, everyone can have their guilty pleasures...

    But I have the criteria. I don't like long and annoying problems (or cheats by compressing with formulas). Good annoying problems should have a short or motivating statement, and knowing it's annoyingness should be nontrivial, or quite hard. I'm not sure my examples are "good" in that sense, though.

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7 months ago, # |
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Hi, i'm having a question:

Assume we've done kruskal algorithm on a list of edges of a connected graph. Then can we check if an edge were in the minimum spanning tree in O(1) with disjoint set we've created? Assume that checking edges exist in edge list.

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    7 months ago, # ^ |
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    Use set/unordered_set.

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      7 months ago, # ^ |
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      Thank you. Using set/map may be the only way to do it.

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7 months ago, # |
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if you yourself know it's boring and useless don't waste both our and your time. what's so hard

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7 months ago, # |
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Starts in 30 minutes!

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7 months ago, # |
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13/10/100 :( See you next time!